US East Retro 8-Day Tour By Train triptoto
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  • Millennium Park

    Millennium Park is a portion of the 319-acre Grant Park, known as the "front lawn" of downtown Chicago,and has four major artistic highlights: the Jay Pritzker Pavilion, Cloud Gate, the Crown Fountain, and the Lurie Garden.

    Millennium Park is successful as a public art venue in part due to the grand scale of each piece and the open spaces for display.Millennium Park is considered one of the largest green roofs in the world, having been constructed on top of a railroad yard and large parking garages.

  • Grant Park

  • Buckingham Fountain

    Buckingham Fountain is a Chicago landmark in the center of Grant Park. Dedicated in 1927, it is one of the largest fountains in the world.

  • Adler Planetarium

    The Adler is home to three full size theaters, extensive space science exhibitions, and a significant collection of antique scientific instruments and print materials. In addition, the Adler boasts the Doane Observatory, one of the only research-active, public urban observatories. This lakeside observatory is the only place in Chicago where the public can see planets, stars, and galaxies up-close and in person.

  • Navy Pier

    No matter the season, Navy Pier is a fun place to spend a few hours, especially with kids in tow. Constructed in 1916 as a commercial-shipping pier and part of Daniel Burnham's Master Plan of Chicago, it stretches half a mile into Lake Michigan. Redesigned and reopened in 1995, it's a major tourist draw. Outside, there's a landscaped area with gardens, a fountain, a carousel, a 15-story Ferris wheel, and a beer garden. Inside you'll find the Crystal Gardens, a six-story glass atrium that serves as an indoor event venue and botanical park; the Smith Museum of Stained Glass Windows; the Chicago Children's Museum; an IMAX theater; the Chicago Shakespeare Theatre; and a bevy of souvenir shops, restaurants, and bars.

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  • The Art Institute of Chicago

    The Art Institute of Chicago, founded in 1879 and located in Chicago's Grant Park, is one of the oldest and largest art museums in the United States. Recognized for its curatorial efforts and popularity among visitors, the museum hosts approximately 1.5 million guests annually.Its collection—stewarded by 11 curatorial departments—is encyclopedic, and includes iconic works such as Georges Seurat's A Sunday on La Grande Jatte — 1884, Pablo Picasso's The Old Guitarist, Edward Hopper's Nighthawks, and Grant Wood's American Gothic. Its permanent collection of nearly 300,000 works of art is augmented by more than 30 special exhibitions mounted yearly that illuminate aspects of the collection and present cutting-edge curatorial and scientific research.

    As a research institution, the Art Institute also has a conservation and conservation science department, five conservation laboratories, and one of the largest art history and architecture libraries in the country—the Ryerson and Burnham Libraries.

  • Willis Tower

    The Willis Tower, built and still commonly referred to as Sears Tower, is a 108-story, 1,451-foot skyscraper in Chicago.The Willis Tower is thesecond-tallest building in the United States and the 14th-tallest in the world. More than one million people visit its observation deck each year, making it one of Chicago's most popular tourist destinations.

    The Willis Tower observation deck, called the Skydeck, opened on June 22, 1974. Located on the 103rd floor of the tower, it is 1,353 feet high and is one of the most famous tourist attractions in Chicago. They can see far over the plains of Illinois and across Lake Michigan to Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin on a clear day. Elevators take tourists to the top in about 60 seconds, and allow tourists to feel the pressure change as they rise up. 

  • City Gallery in the Historic Water Tower

    The Chicago Water Tower is a contributing property in the Old Chicago Water Tower District landmark district. It is located at 806 North Michigan Avenue along the Magnificent Mile shopping district in the Near North Side community areaof Chicago, Illinois in a small park, the Jane M. Byrne Plaza. The tower was constructed to house a large water pump, intended to draw water from Lake Michigan. It is the second-oldest water tower in the United States, after the Louisville Water Tower in Louisville, Kentucky.

    The Chicago Water Tower now serves as a Chicago Office of Tourism art gallery known as the City Gallery in the Historic Water Tower. It features the work of local photographers and artists.

  • 360 CHICAGO

    The John Hancock Center is a 100-story, 1,127-foot supertall skyscraper at 875 North Michigan Avenue,Chicago.When the building topped out on May 6, 1968,it was the second tallest building in the world and the tallest outside of New York City. It is currently the fourth-tallest building in Chicago and the eighth-tallest in the United States, after One World Trade Center, the Willis Tower,432 Park Avenue, the Trump Tower Chicago, the Empire State Building, the Bank of America Tower, and the Aon Center. When measured to the top of its antenna masts, it stands at 1,506 feet.The building is home to offices and restaurants, as well as about 700 condominiums, and contains the third highest residence in the world, after the Trump Tower in Chicago and the Burj Khalifa in Dubai.

    From the 95th floor restaurant, diners can look out at Chicago and Lake Michigan. The Observatory (360 Chicago),which competes with the Willis Tower's Skydeck, has a 360° view of the city, up to four states, and a distance of over 80 miles (130 km). The Observatory has Chicago's only open-air SkyWalk and also features a free multimedia tour in six languages.The 44th-floor sky lobby features America's highest indoor swimming pool.

  • Museum Of Contemporary Art Chicago

    The Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) Chicago is a contemporary art museum near Water Tower Place in downtown Chicagoin Cook County. The museum, which was established in 1967, is one of the world's largest contemporary art venues. The museum's collection is composed of thousands of objects of Post-World War II visual art. The museum is run gallery-style, with individually curated exhibitions throughout the year. Each exhibition may be composed of temporary loans, pieces from their permanent collection, or a combination of the two.

  • AMC Navy Pier IMAX

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  • Harvard University

    Harvard University is a private research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts (US) established in 1636. It's considered among the world's most prestigious universities.

    The University is organized into eleven separate academic units—ten faculties and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study—with campuses throughout the Boston metropolitan area: its 209-acre (85 ha) main campus is centered on Harvard Yard in Cambridge, approximately 3 miles (5 km) northwest of Boston; the business school and athletics facilities, including Harvard Stadium, are located across the Charles River in the Allston neighborhood of Boston and the medical, dental, and public health schools are in the Longwood Medical Area.Harvard's $37.6 billion financial endowment is the largest of any academic institution.

  • John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site

    The John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site is the birthplace and childhood home of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States, located at 83 Beals Street in the Coolidge Corner neighborhood ofBrookline, Massachusetts. The property is now owned by the National Park Service; tours of the house are offered, and a film is presented.

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  • Langone Park

    Langone Park is a waterfront park in the North End of Boston, Massachusetts. the park features a Little League Baseball field, a playground, and three bocce courts.It is located on Commercial Street at the edge of Boston Harbor, immediately to the west of the Andrew P. Puopolo Jr. Athletic Field.

    To the southwest the park borders on Copp's Hill Terrace and further south is Copp's Hill Burial Ground. Both sites are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

  • Boston Common

  • Trinity Episcopal Church

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  • Metropolitan Museum of Art (Met)

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, colloquially "the Met",is located in New York City and is the largest art museum in the United States, and is among the most visited art museums in the world.Its permanent collection contains over two million works, divided among seventeen curatorial departments. The main building, on the eastern edge of Central Park along Manhattan's Museum Mile, is by area one of the world's largest art galleries. A much smaller second location, The Cloisters at Fort Tryon Park in Upper Manhattan, contains an extensive collection of art, architecture, and artifacts from Medieval Europe.

    The permanent collection consists of works of art from classical antiquity and ancient Egypt, paintings and sculptures from nearly all the European masters, and an extensive collection of American and modern art. The Met maintains extensive holdings of African, Asian, Oceanian, Byzantine, Indian, and Islamic art.The museum is home to encyclopedic collections of musical instruments, costumes and accessories, as well as antique weapons and armor from around the world.Several notable interiors, ranging from first-century Rome through modern American design, are installed in its galleries.

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded in 1870. The founders included businessmen and financiers, as well as leading artists and thinkers of the day, who wanted to open a museum to bring art and art education to the American people.

  • Central Park

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  • Statue of Liberty National Monument

    The Statue of Liberty National Monument is a United States national monument located in the U.S. states of New Jerseyand New York comprising Liberty Island and Ellis Island.It includes Liberty Enlightening the World, commonly known as the Statue of Liberty, situated on Liberty Island, and the former immigration station at Ellis Island which opened in 1892 and closed in 1954.

    This is New York in one sight. The iconic, majestic statue is an absolute must-see while visiting the city.

  • Ground Zero

  • Wall Street

  • Empire State Building

    The famous skyscrapers in New York, Empire State Building was built in 1931, a total of 102 layers, now is the third highest skyscrapers in the United States.It is a great place to have a bird's eye view of New York, night sceneone is especially beautiful.On Valentine's day, Christmas day, Independence day, such as the traditional holiday in the United States, the color of the building at the top will transform.Beginning in 2001, the Empire State Building will light up the night full of Chinese characteristics of red, yellow colour in each year during the Spring Festival.

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  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

    The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial is a presidential memorial in Washington D.C. dedicated to the memory of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the 32nd President of the United States, and to the era he represents.
  • Tidal Basin

  • Washington Monument

  • Thomas Jefferson Memorial

    The Thomas Jefferson Memorial is a presidential memorial in Washington, D.C., dedicated to Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826), one of the most important of the American Founding Fathers as the main drafter and writer of the Declaration of Independence, member of the Continental Congress, governor of the newly independent Commonwealth of Virginia, American minister to King Louis XVI and the Kingdom of France, first U.S. Secretary of State under the first President George Washington, the second Vice President of the United States under second President John Adams, and also the third President (1801–1809), as well as being the founder of the University of Virginia at Charlottesville, Virginia.

    The neoclassical Memorial building on the Tidal Basin off the Washington Channel of the Potomac River was designed by the architect John Russell Pope. Construction of the building began in 1939 and was completed in 1943. The bronze statue of Jefferson was added in 1947.

  • Lincoln Memorial

    Many consider this to be the most inspiring monument in Washington, but that hasn't always been the case: early detractors thought it inappropriate that a president known for his humility should be honored with what some felt amounts to a grandiose Greek temple. The memorial was intended to be a symbol of national unity, but over time it has come to represent social justice and civil rights. Highlights Daniel Chester French's statue of the seated president gazes out over the Reflecting Pool. The 19-foot-high sculpture is made of 28 pieces of Georgia marble. The surrounding white Colorado-marble memorial was designed by Henry Bacon and completed in 1922. The 36 Doric columns represent the 36 states in the Union at the time of Lincoln's death; their names appear on the frieze above the columns. Over the frieze are the names of the 48 states in existence when the memorial was dedicated. Alaska and Hawaii are represented with an inscription on the terrace leading up to the memorial. At night the memorial is illuminated, creating a striking play of light and shadow across Lincoln's face. Two of Lincoln's great speeches—the second inaugural address and the Gettysburg Address—are carved on the north and south walls. Above each is a Jules Guerin mural: the south wall has an angel of truth freeing a slave; the unity of North and South is opposite. The memorial's powerful symbolism makes it a popular gathering place: in its shadow Americans marched for integrated schools in 1958, rallied for an end to the Vietnam War in 1967, and laid wreaths in a ceremony honoring the Iranian hostages in 1979. It may be best known, though, as the site of Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech. Tips The power of pennies? On the lower level of the memorial is a small museum financed with pennies collected by schoolchildren. Lincoln's face and hands look especially lifelike because they're based on castings done while he was president. Those who know sign language might recognize that the left hand is shaped like an A and the right like an L. It's unlikely this was intentional, but the sculptor, Daniel Chester French, did have a deaf son. Marchers flock to the Lincoln every year, drawing attention to various causes. Lincoln's famous Emancipation Proclamation, which set the stage for ending slavery, is occasionally on display at the National Archives (Constitution Avenue, between 7th and 9th streets). See where Lincoln was shot (on April 14, 1865) at Ford's Theatre (511 10th Street NW).
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  • The White House

    The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States, located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C.Because of its exterior wall is white-painted Aquia Creek sandstone, thus its name. It has been the residence of every U.S. president since John Adams in 1800.

    The White House is divided into the Main Building and the East Wingand,West Wing. The Main Building has the library, the showroom of gold, silver and porcelain,inside collecting gifts of countries in the world.The East Wingand for tourists to visit, The West Wing houses the President's office (the Oval Office) and offices of his senior staff, with room for about 50 employees,outside is the Rose Garden and the South Lawn of the White House.
  • National Gallery of Art

  • Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

    The National Museum of Natural History is a natural history museum administered by the Smithsonian Institution, located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.. With free admission and open doors 364 days a year, it is the third most visited museum in the world, the most visited natural history museum in the world, and the most visited museum (of any type) in North America.Opened in 1910, the museum on the National Mall was one of the first Smithsonian buildings constructed exclusively to hold the national collections and research facilities.The main building has an overall area of 1,320,000 square feet with 350,000 square feet of exhibition and public space and houses over 1,000 employees.

    The museum's collections total over 126 million specimens of plants, animals, fossils, minerals, rocks, meteorites, human remains, and human cultural artifacts. With 8 million visitors in 2013, it is the most visited of all of the Smithsonian museums and is also home to about 185 professional natural history scientists — the largest group of scientists dedicated to the study of natural and cultural history in the world.