Coast-to-Coast 15-Day Overall Tour Across U.S. triptoto
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Econo Lodge At The Falls North
Cost: 130 USD    Number of rooms: 1
  • Corning Museum of Glass

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  • The White House

    The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States, located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C.Because of its exterior wall is white-painted Aquia Creek sandstone, thus its name. It has been the residence of every U.S. president since John Adams in 1800.

    The White House is divided into the Main Building and the East Wingand,West Wing. The Main Building has the library, the showroom of gold, silver and porcelain,inside collecting gifts of countries in the world.The East Wingand for tourists to visit, The West Wing houses the President's office (the Oval Office) and offices of his senior staff, with room for about 50 employees,outside is the Rose Garden and the South Lawn of the White House.
  • United States Capitol

  • Washington Monument

  • World War II Memorial

    The World War II Memorial is a memorial of national significance dedicated to Americans who served in the armed forces and as civilians during World War II. Consisting of 56 pillars and a pair of small triumphal arches surrounding a plaza and fountain, it sits on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on the former site of the Rainbow Pool at the eastern end of the Reflecting Pool, between the Lincoln Memorial and the Washington Monument.

    Opened on April 29, 2004, it was dedicated by President George W. Bush on May 29.As of 2009, more than 4.4 million people visit the memorial each year.

    The Freedom Wall is on the west side of the memorial, with a view of the Reflecting Pool and Lincoln Memorial behind it. The wall has 4,048 gold stars, each representing 100 Americans who died in the war. In front of the wall lies the message "Here we mark the price of freedom".

  • Lincoln Memorial

    Many consider this to be the most inspiring monument in Washington, but that hasn't always been the case: early detractors thought it inappropriate that a president known for his humility should be honored with what some felt amounts to a grandiose Greek temple. The memorial was intended to be a symbol of national unity, but over time it has come to represent social justice and civil rights. Highlights Daniel Chester French's statue of the seated president gazes out over the Reflecting Pool. The 19-foot-high sculpture is made of 28 pieces of Georgia marble. The surrounding white Colorado-marble memorial was designed by Henry Bacon and completed in 1922. The 36 Doric columns represent the 36 states in the Union at the time of Lincoln's death; their names appear on the frieze above the columns. Over the frieze are the names of the 48 states in existence when the memorial was dedicated. Alaska and Hawaii are represented with an inscription on the terrace leading up to the memorial. At night the memorial is illuminated, creating a striking play of light and shadow across Lincoln's face. Two of Lincoln's great speeches—the second inaugural address and the Gettysburg Address—are carved on the north and south walls. Above each is a Jules Guerin mural: the south wall has an angel of truth freeing a slave; the unity of North and South is opposite. The memorial's powerful symbolism makes it a popular gathering place: in its shadow Americans marched for integrated schools in 1958, rallied for an end to the Vietnam War in 1967, and laid wreaths in a ceremony honoring the Iranian hostages in 1979. It may be best known, though, as the site of Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech. Tips The power of pennies? On the lower level of the memorial is a small museum financed with pennies collected by schoolchildren. Lincoln's face and hands look especially lifelike because they're based on castings done while he was president. Those who know sign language might recognize that the left hand is shaped like an A and the right like an L. It's unlikely this was intentional, but the sculptor, Daniel Chester French, did have a deaf son. Marchers flock to the Lincoln every year, drawing attention to various causes. Lincoln's famous Emancipation Proclamation, which set the stage for ending slavery, is occasionally on display at the National Archives (Constitution Avenue, between 7th and 9th streets). See where Lincoln was shot (on April 14, 1865) at Ford's Theatre (511 10th Street NW).
  • Tidal Basin

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  • Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

    The National Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution, also called the NASM, is a museum in Washington, D.C.. It holds the largest collection of historic aircraft and spacecraft in the world. It was established in 1946 as the National Air Museum and opened its main building near L'Enfant Plaza in 1976. In 2014, the museum saw approximately 6.7 million visitors, making it the fifth most visited museum in the world.

    The National Air and Space Museum is a center for research into the history and science of aviation and spaceflight, as well as planetary science and terrestrial geology and geophysics. Almost all space and aircraft on display are originals or backups to the originals. It operates an annex, the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, at Dulles International Airport, which opened in 2003 and itself encompasses 760,000 square feet. The museum currently conducts restoration of its collection at the Paul E. Garber Preservation, Restoration, and Storage Facility in Suitland, Maryland, while steadily moving such restoration and archival activities into its Udvar-Hazy annex facilities as of 2014.

  • Thomas Jefferson Memorial

    The Thomas Jefferson Memorial is a presidential memorial in Washington, D.C., dedicated to Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826), one of the most important of the American Founding Fathers as the main drafter and writer of the Declaration of Independence, member of the Continental Congress, governor of the newly independent Commonwealth of Virginia, American minister to King Louis XVI and the Kingdom of France, first U.S. Secretary of State under the first President George Washington, the second Vice President of the United States under second President John Adams, and also the third President (1801–1809), as well as being the founder of the University of Virginia at Charlottesville, Virginia.

    The neoclassical Memorial building on the Tidal Basin off the Washington Channel of the Potomac River was designed by the architect John Russell Pope. Construction of the building began in 1939 and was completed in 1943. The bronze statue of Jefferson was added in 1947.

  • Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

    The National Museum of Natural History is a natural history museum administered by the Smithsonian Institution, located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.. With free admission and open doors 364 days a year, it is the third most visited museum in the world, the most visited natural history museum in the world, and the most visited museum (of any type) in North America.Opened in 1910, the museum on the National Mall was one of the first Smithsonian buildings constructed exclusively to hold the national collections and research facilities.The main building has an overall area of 1,320,000 square feet with 350,000 square feet of exhibition and public space and houses over 1,000 employees.

    The museum's collections total over 126 million specimens of plants, animals, fossils, minerals, rocks, meteorites, human remains, and human cultural artifacts. With 8 million visitors in 2013, it is the most visited of all of the Smithsonian museums and is also home to about 185 professional natural history scientists — the largest group of scientists dedicated to the study of natural and cultural history in the world.

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Hilton Garden Inn® Norwalk
Cost: 134 USD    Number of rooms: 1
  • Independence Hall

  • Liberty Bell

    The Liberty Bell is an iconic symbol of American independence, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Formerly placed in the steeple of the Pennsylvania State House (now renamed Independence Hall), the bell today is located in the Liberty Bell Center in Independence National Historical Park. The bell was commissioned from the Londonfirm of Lester and Pack (today the Whitechapel Bell Foundry) in 1752, and was cast with the lettering "ProclaimLIBERTY throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof," a Biblical reference from the Book of Leviticus (25:10). The bell first cracked when rung after its arrival in Philadelphia, and was twice recast by local workmen John Pass and John Stow, whose last names appear on the bell. In its early years, the Liberty Bell was used to summon lawmakers to legislative sessions and to alert citizens to public meetings and proclamations.

    No immediate announcement was made of the Second Continental Congress's vote for independence, and thus the bell could not have rung on July 4, 1776, at least not for any reason related to that vote. Bells were rung to mark the reading of the Declaration of Independence on July 8, 1776, and while there is no contemporary account of the Liberty Bell ringing, most historians believe it was one of the bells rung. After American independence was secured, it fell into relative obscurity for some years. In the 1830s, the bell was adopted as a symbol by abolitionist societies, who dubbed it the "Liberty Bell."

  • Philadelphia City Hall

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  • Woodbury Common Premium Outlets

  • United States Military Academy

  • Rockefeller Center

    Rockefeller Center is a complex of 19 commercial buildings covering 22 acres (89,000 m2) between 48th and 51st Streetsin New York City. Commissioned by the Rockefeller family, it is located in the center of Midtown Manhattan, spanning the area between Fifth Avenue and Sixth Avenue.It was the largest private building project ever undertaken in modern times. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1987.

  • Times Square

    Known as "The Crossroads of the World" and "The Great White Way," Times Square is one of the world's most visited tourist attractions, drawing an estimated 50 million visitors annually. It is here that Good Morning America is broadcast live to the nation, here that the New Year's Eve ball is dropped.

    Many people come to Times Square for the ambiance and the billboards spectacle, but there are also many restaurants and shops - well over 100 - in the area including some crowd-pullers such as the Disney Store. Times Square is also best known for its entertainment, and plenty of visitors come here to attend a Broadway show.

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  • Statue of Liberty National Monument

    The Statue of Liberty National Monument is a United States national monument located in the U.S. states of New Jerseyand New York comprising Liberty Island and Ellis Island.It includes Liberty Enlightening the World, commonly known as the Statue of Liberty, situated on Liberty Island, and the former immigration station at Ellis Island which opened in 1892 and closed in 1954.

    This is New York in one sight. The iconic, majestic statue is an absolute must-see while visiting the city.

  • Wall Street

  • Metropolitan Museum of Art (Met)

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, colloquially "the Met",is located in New York City and is the largest art museum in the United States, and is among the most visited art museums in the world.Its permanent collection contains over two million works, divided among seventeen curatorial departments. The main building, on the eastern edge of Central Park along Manhattan's Museum Mile, is by area one of the world's largest art galleries. A much smaller second location, The Cloisters at Fort Tryon Park in Upper Manhattan, contains an extensive collection of art, architecture, and artifacts from Medieval Europe.

    The permanent collection consists of works of art from classical antiquity and ancient Egypt, paintings and sculptures from nearly all the European masters, and an extensive collection of American and modern art. The Met maintains extensive holdings of African, Asian, Oceanian, Byzantine, Indian, and Islamic art.The museum is home to encyclopedic collections of musical instruments, costumes and accessories, as well as antique weapons and armor from around the world.Several notable interiors, ranging from first-century Rome through modern American design, are installed in its galleries.

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded in 1870. The founders included businessmen and financiers, as well as leading artists and thinkers of the day, who wanted to open a museum to bring art and art education to the American people.

  • Central Park

  • Strawberry Fields

  • Empire State Building

    The famous skyscrapers in New York, Empire State Building was built in 1931, a total of 102 layers, now is the third highest skyscrapers in the United States.It is a great place to have a bird's eye view of New York, night sceneone is especially beautiful.On Valentine's day, Christmas day, Independence day, such as the traditional holiday in the United States, the color of the building at the top will transform.Beginning in 2001, the Empire State Building will light up the night full of Chinese characteristics of red, yellow colour in each year during the Spring Festival.

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  • Ground Zero

  • Hudson River Park

  • Intrepid Sea,Air & Space Museum

    Flight museum on an aircraft carrier whose exhibits include a Concorde, submarine & space shuttle.

  • United Nations Headquarters

  • Broadway

    Actually the Broadway is a stretch of the avenue, south to the Battery Park, through the Manhattan island in New York City from south to north.Due to the lots of theatres on both sides of this avenue, it is the important cradle of the drama and musical in U.S, therefore become the synonym of the American drama and musical.The theatres of 44th St to 53th St on Broadway is called In Broadway, the theatres of 41th St to 53th St is called Off Broadway, the performance of In Broadway is some classic, popular, commercial play,but the performance of Off Broadway is a few experimental, unknown, low-cost play.

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Yellowstone Gateway Inn
Cost: 145 USD    Number of rooms: 1
  • Yellowstone National Park

    Yellowstone National Park is a nearly 3,500-sq.-mile wilderness recreation area atop a volcanic hot spot. Mostly in Wyoming, the park spreads into parts of Montana and Idaho too. Yellowstone features dramatic canyons, alpine rivers, lush forests, hot springs and gushing geysers, including its most famous, Old Faithful. It's also home to hundreds of animal species, including bears, wolves, bison, elk and antelope.

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  • Norris Geyser Basin Museum

    Norris Geyser Basin is the hottest, oldest, and most dynamic of Yellowstone's thermal areas. The highest temperature yet recorded in any geothermal area in Yellowstone was measured in a scientific drill hole at Norris: 459°F (237°C) just 1,087 feet below the surface! There are very few thermal features at Norris under the boiling point (199°F at this elevation).

    Norris shows evidence of having had thermal features for at least 115,000 years. The features in the basin change daily, with frequent disturbances from seismic activity and water fluctuations. The vast majority of the waters at Norris are acidic, including acid geysers which are very rare. Steamboat Geyser, the tallest geyser in the world (300 to 400 feet) and Echinus Geyser (pH 3.5 or so) are the most popular features.

    The basin consists of two areas: Porcelain Basin and the Back Basin. Porcelain Basin is barren of trees and provides a sensory experience in sound, color, and smell; a 3/4 mile dirt and boardwalk trail accesses this area. Back Basin is more heavily wooded with features scattered throughout the area; a 1.5 mile trail of boardwalk and dirt encircles this part of the basin.The area was named after Philetus W. Norris, the second superintendent of Yellowstone, who provided the first detailed information about the thermal features.

  • Yellowstone Lake

    Visit the Shore of Yellowstone Lake:

    Geologists indicate that large volcanic eruptionshave occurred in Yellowstone on an approximate interval of 600,000 years. The most recent of these (600,000 years ago) erupted from two large vents, one near Old Faithful, the Mallard Lake Dome, and one just north of Fishing Bridge, the Sour Creek Dome. Ash from this huge explosion, 1,000 times the size of Mt. St. Helens, has been found all across the continent. The magma chamber then collapsed, forming a large caldera filled partially by subsequent lava flows. Part of this caldera is the 136-square mile basin of Yellowstone Lake. The original lake was 200 ft. higher than the present-day lake, extending northward across Hayden Valley to the base of Mt. Washburn.

  • Artist Point

    Artist Point is a cliff on the south rim of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone due west of Yellowstone Falls on the Yellowstone River in Yellowstone National Park. The point was originally named in 1883 by Frank Jay Haynes who improperly believed that the point was the place at which painter Thomas Moran sketched his 1872 depictions of the falls. Later work determined that the sketches were made from the north rim, but the name Artist Point stuck.

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  • Morning Glory Pool

    Morning Glory Pool is a hot spring in the Upper Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park in the United States.

  • Lower Terraces Area

    As one early visitor described the Mammoth Hot Springs terraces, "No human architect ever designed such intricate fountains as these. The water trickles over the edges from one to another, blending them together with the effect of a frozen waterfall." The hot springs were an early commercialized attraction for those seeking relief from ailments in the mineral waters.

    Mammoth Hot Springs are a surface expression of the deep volcanic forces at work in Yellowstone. Although these springs lie outside the caldera boundary, scientists surmise that the heat from the hot springs comes from the same magmatic system that fuels other Yellowstone thermal areas. A large fault system runs between Norris Geyser Basin and Mammoth, which may allow thermal water to flow between the two. Also, multiple basalt eruptions have occurred in this area. Thus, basalt may be a heat source for the Mammoth area.

  • Tower Fall

    132-ft. falls, seen from an overlook with a general store above or via a short hike to the bottom.

  • Hayden Valley

    Hayden Valley is an excellent place to view wildlife, including grizzly bears, particularly in the spring and early summer when they may be preying upon newborn bison and elk calves. Large herds of bison are often seen in the spring and early summer and during the fall rut. Coyotes are often seen in the valley. Bird life is abundant in and along the river. A variety of shore birds may be seen in the mud flats at Alum Creek. Ducks, geese, and American white pelicans cruise the river.Bird watchers should look for bald eagles, northern harriers, and sandhill cranes.

  • West Thumb Geyser Basin

    West Thumb was created approximately 162,000 years ago when a magma chamber bulged up under the surface of the earth and subsequently cracked it along ring fracture zones. This in turn released the enclosed magma as lava and caused the surface above the emptied magma chamber to collapse.Water later filled the collapsed area of the caldera, forming an extension of Yellowstone Lake. This created the source of heat and water that feed the West Thumb Geyser Basin today.

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Hampton Inn Salt Lake City - Murray
Cost: 139 USD    Number of rooms: 1
  • Grand Teton National Park

    Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.

  • Jackson

    Jackson is a town in the Jackson Hole valley of Teton County, Wyoming, United States. It is the county seat of Teton County and is its largest town.

    Jackson is a very popular tourist town bringing in tourists from all over the country. Throughout the town elk antler arches are a big attraction that tourists enjoy.

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  • Las Vegas North Premium Outlets

    Large mall with 150 shops of designer & household brands in clothing, accessories, leather & gifts. 

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  • Grand Canyon National Park Science and Resource Management

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  • Rodeo Drive

  • Beverly Hills

    Beverly Hills is an enclaved city in Los Angeles County in Southern California, surrounded almost entirely by Los Angeles. Since the 1950s, Beverly Hills has marketed itself as a high-end shopping paradise and home of the rich and famous, which still rings true today; its reputation has even been the basis of a few popular TV shows such as The Beverly Hillbillies and Beverly Hills, 90210. Santa Monica Boulevard bisects the city, with most of the businesses being in the south, the north being primarily residential. Most visitors come to shop or dream of shopping.

    Others try to hunt down their favorite celebrities' homes, but be careful as many celebrities consider that stalking. Thanks to their friends in the state legislature, California has strict anti-stalking laws.

    Note for Bevenly Hills, 90210 fans, there is no West Beverly High; the program was filmed in Torrance High in Torrance.

  • Staples Center

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  • Old Town

    The Old Town is the oldest settled area in San Diego and is the site of the first European settlement in present-day California.It contains Old Town San Diego State Historic Park and Presidio Park, both of which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

  • Balboa Park

  • USS Midway Museum

    The USS Midway Museum is a maritime museum.It consists of the aircraft carrier Midway(CV-41).Life-at-sea exhibits, restored planes & flight simulators aboard this legendary aircraft carrier. 

    The USS Midway was America's longest-serving aircraft carrier of the 20th century, from 1945 to 1992.Midway opened as a museum on 7 June 2004.As of 2015 Midway is the most popular naval warship museum in the United States.